Fuel Duty – NOT THAT WAY!

Perusing through my twitter timeline earlier I spotted a news story that basically says the fight for lower and fairer fuel duty is going about as well as ever.


Despite defeating Commie Corbyn in the time that’s elapsed since I last posted on this place, and the Conservatives this website was originally set up to support from the grassroots won big style, you may have noticed there was enough frustration with the way the party was heading as it was without this crap.

There’s the nonsense of trying to get rid of proper cars that actually work + the nonsense about trying to get rid of cheap to run ways to stay warm in winter. Now there’s this.

People were already pissed off with the price of Petrol and Diesel when the last Labour government was seeing out it’s final few years, and it’s mostly just been frozen in the time the Conservatives have been running the show.

Earlier I wrote a blog post or policy page (or was planning to) suggesting scrapping fuel duty altogether (as well as Alcohol + Tobacco duties), and just sticking a single higher 35% “sin” rate of VAT on them instead to make things fairer and clearer.

I sort of lost track of how much of the cost petrol & diesel consists of the tax on the stuff several years ago when it was hovering around 70-75% or something stupid like that.


UPDATE:

Still Waiting for Brexit and MayExit

It’s 12th May as I start typing this attempt at a blog post, about 45 days after Britain was supposed to exit the EU either via a Real Brexit WTO “no deal” method or a Lesser Brexit with a deal that’s not really a proper full Brexit from the EU.

Party members do not appear too amused, with 82% of members wanting rid of PM Theresa May and a new party leader put in place according to a poll by the people over at ConservativeHome.

The electorate also seem even less amused than that, with the party losing over 1300 Councillors in the local elections at the start of the month, and things looking not much better in the polling for the upcoming European Elections costing £150million that we shouldn’t be needing to have. Continue reading “Still Waiting for Brexit and MayExit”

Another Support Losing Green Crap Policy from the “Conservative” Government

Some time around 2016/2017, much was being made about how the USA was cutting emissions big style by increasing use of Natural Gas.

Fast forward to today’s UK Budget statement thingy……….


The feedback in the comments were largely not of a positive supportive nature, and more along the lines of it being a batshit crazy stupid idea…. Continue reading “Another Support Losing Green Crap Policy from the “Conservative” Government”

Gove’s statement on why he supports Brexit

Statement from Michael Gove MP, Secretary of State for Justice, on the EU Referendum

Immediate release, 20 February 2016

For weeks now I have been wrestling with the most difficult decision of my political life. But taking difficult decisions is what politicians are paid to do. No-one is forced to stand for Parliament, no-one is compelled to become a minister. If you take on those roles, which are great privileges, you also take on big responsibilities.

I was encouraged to stand for Parliament by David Cameron and he has given me the opportunity to serve in what I believe is a great, reforming Government. I think he is an outstanding Prime Minister. There is, as far as I can see, only one significant issue on which we have differed.

And that is the future of the UK in the European Union.

It pains me to have to disagree with the Prime Minister on any issue. My instinct is to support him through good times and bad.

But I cannot duck the choice which the Prime Minister has given every one of us. In a few months time we will all have the opportunity to decide whether Britain should stay in the European Union or leave. I believe our country would be freer, fairer and better off outside the EU. And if, at this moment of decision, I didn’t say what I believe I would not be true to my convictions or my country.

I don’t want to take anything away from the Prime Minister’s dedicated efforts to get a better deal for Britain. He has negotiated with courage and tenacity. But I think Britain would be stronger outside the EU.

My starting point is simple. I believe that the decisions which govern all our lives, the laws we must all obey and the taxes we must all pay should be decided by people we choose and who we can throw out if we want change. If power is to be used wisely, if we are to avoid corruption and complacency in high office, then the public must have the right to change laws and Governments at election time.

But our membership of the European Union prevents us being able to change huge swathes of law and stops us being able to choose who makes critical decisions which affect all our lives. Laws which govern citizens in this country are decided by politicians from other nations who we never elected and can’t throw out. We can take out our anger on elected representatives in Westminster but whoever is in Government in London cannot remove or reduce VAT, cannot support a steel plant through troubled times, cannot build the houses we need where they’re needed and cannot deport all the individuals who shouldn’t be in this country. I believe that needs to change. And I believe that both the lessons of our past and the shape of the future make the case for change compelling.

The ability to choose who governs us, and the freedom to change laws we do not like, were secured for us in the past by radicals and liberals who took power from unaccountable elites and placed it in the hands of the people. As a result of their efforts we developed, and exported to nations like the US, India, Canada and Australia a system of democratic self-government which has brought prosperity and peace to millions.

Our democracy stood the test of time. We showed the world what a free people could achieve if they were allowed to govern themselves.

In Britain we established trial by jury in the modern world, we set up the first free parliament, we ensured no-one could be arbitrarily detained at the behest of the Government, we forced our rulers to recognise they ruled by consent not by right, we led the world in abolishing slavery, we established free education for all, national insurance, the National Health Service and a national broadcaster respected across the world.

By way of contrast, the European Union, despite the undoubted idealism of its founders and the good intentions of so many leaders, has proved a failure on so many fronts. The euro has created economic misery for Europe’s poorest people. European Union regulation has entrenched mass unemployment. EU immigration policies have encouraged people traffickers and brought desperate refugee camps to our borders.

Far from providing security in an uncertain world, the EU’s policies have become a source of instability and insecurity. Razor wire once more criss-crosses the continent, historic tensions between nations such as Greece and Germany have resurfaced in ugly ways and the EU is proving incapable of dealing with the current crises in Libya and Syria. The former head of Interpol says the EU’s internal borders policy is “like hanging a sign welcoming terrorists to Europe” and Scandinavian nations which once prided themselves on their openness are now turning in on themselves. All of these factors, combined with popular anger at the lack of political accountability, has encouraged extremism, to the extent that far-right parties are stronger across the continent than at any time since the 1930s.

The EU is an institution rooted in the past and is proving incapable of reforming to meet the big technological, demographic and economic challenges of our time. It was developed in the 1950s and 1960s and like other institutions which seemed modern then, from tower blocks to telexes, it is now hopelessly out of date. The EU tries to standardise and regulate rather than encourage diversity and innovation. It is an analogue union in a digital age.

The EU is built to keep power and control with the elites rather than the people. Even though we are outside the euro we are still subject to an unelected EU commission which is generating new laws every day and an unaccountable European Court in Luxembourg which is extending its reach every week, increasingly using the Charter of Fundamental Rights which in many ways gives the EU more power and reach than ever before. This growing EU bureaucracy holds us back in every area. EU rules dictate everything from the maximum size of containers in which olive oil may be sold (five litres) to the distance houses have to be from heathland to prevent cats chasing birds (five kilometres).

Individually these rules may be comical. Collectively, and there are tens of thousands of them, they are inimical to creativity, growth and progress. Rules like the EU clinical trials directive have slowed down the creation of new drugs to cure terrible diseases and ECJ judgements on data protection issues hobble the growth of internet companies. As a minister I’ve seen hundreds of new EU rules cross my desk, none of which were requested by the UK Parliament, none of which I or any other British politician could alter in any way and none of which made us freer, richer or fairer.

It is hard to overstate the degree to which the EU is a constraint on ministers’ ability to do the things they were elected to do, or to use their judgment about the right course of action for the people of this country. I have long had concerns about our membership of the EU but the experience of Government has only deepened my conviction that we need change. Every single day, every single minister is told: ‘Yes Minister, I understand, but I’m afraid that’s against EU rules’. I know it. My colleagues in government know it. And the British people ought to know it too: your government is not, ultimately, in control in hundreds of areas that matter.

But by leaving the EU we can take control. Indeed we can show the rest of Europe the way to flourish. Instead of grumbling and complaining about the things we can’t change and growing resentful and bitter, we can shape an optimistic, forward-looking and genuinely internationalist alternative to the path the EU is going down. We can show leadership. Like the Americans who declared their independence and never looked back, we can become an exemplar of what an inclusive, open and innovative democracy can achieve.

We can take back the billions we give to the EU, the money which is squandered on grand parliamentary buildings and bureaucratic follies, and invest it in science and technology, schools and apprenticeships. We can get rid of the regulations which big business uses to crush competition and instead support new start-up businesses and creative talent. We can forge trade deals and partnerships with nations across the globe, helping developing countries to grow and benefiting from faster and better access to new markets.

We are the world’s fifth largest economy, with the best armed forces of any nation, more Nobel Prizes than any European country and more world-leading universities than any European country. Our economy is more dynamic than the Eurozone, we have the most attractive capital city on the globe, the greatest “soft power” and global influence of any state and a leadership role in NATO and the UN. Are we really too small, too weak and too powerless to make a success of self-rule? On the contrary, the reason the EU’s bureaucrats oppose us leaving is they fear that our success outside will only underline the scale of their failure.

This chance may never come again in our lifetimes, which is why I will be true to my principles and take the opportunity this referendum provides to leave an EU mired in the past and embrace a better future.
ENDS

What became of Gordon Brown’s infamous Stealth Taxes?

This is the random question that just popped into my head a few minutes ago.
I’ve seen plenty of mention of them in the past, such as at this link I like to keep handy: http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/garbagegate/item2/stealth.htm

I suppose I’d be right in guessing that unlike Gordon Brown, a large chunk of them haven’t disappeared yet and are still sneaking extra money out of our pockets into the government piggy bank, in addition to the “super star” taxes that get all the main attention, e.g. Income Tax, National Insurance, Fuel Tax, Road Tax, etc.

Am I right?

A money saving idea – a bit grisly, but…..

From what I’ve heard it costs between £30,000 – £50,000 a year to keep someone in prison (though don’t know how they got that figure).

So based on that, to keep someone who’s done something to land them a life sentence would cost the following:

20 years = £600,000 – £1,000,000 (a million quid)
25 years = £750,000 – £1,250,000
30 years = £900,000 – £1,500,000

In comparison, a length of rope costs less than £1 a metre (unless maybe it was bought through one of New Labour’s dodgy PFI Contracts). A Gun such as a Heckler & Koch MP5 can be picked up over in the USA for about $1,500 (£901), and a box of 9mm bullets apparently cost $20 in Walmart over in the states…. for some people, surely the death penalty is the better option? (and it saves the taxpayers money having to look after the scum)

Changing the name of National Insurance

Earlier on I saw news that George Osborne was thinking of changing the name of National Insurance to “Earnings Tax”.

The Taxpayers Alliance seemed pretty chuffed…..

Others weren’t so sure…..

I’m of the opinion of a different choice of name than “Earnings Tax”. We’ve already got an “Earnings Tax”, it’s called Income Tax. I’ve thought maybe “Health & Welfare Contributions T ax” would be more appropriate (and use it ONLY for that), or just get on with merging it into a Flat Income Tax, and stick it in a breakdown as “Income Tax: Health & Welfare Contributions”.

UPDATE: The Taxpayer’s Alliance have made a follow-up post on Facebook….

Told you so: When discussing replacing the Human Rights Act with Sanity, be careful how you phrase it

I seem to remember in the not too distant past mentioning below an article on ConservativeHome or somewhere that we needed to be careful how we phrase it when discussing replacing the Human Rights act with something that has a bit more sanity to it (though I can’t currently find it).

I knew this because I’d previously seen on Yahoo Answers (part of Yahoo, the 4th most popular website in the world) leftie idiots asking why UKIP want to revoke Human rights, after they’d had pretty much the same idea, which I got the best answer for correcting them with:

They don’t want to revoke human rights……… they just want to replace the ECHR’s screwed-up interpretation of Human Rights with a better version that hasn’t been written & administered by unelected complete retards who put Criminals & Terrorist’s rights above those of their victims, as some of the decisions coming from the ECHR lot in the past decade or so have started getting bloody ridiculous.

It seems my recommendation that we needed to be careful phrasing replacing Human Rights act with a British Bill of Rights, or similar sane replacements, has fallen on deaf ears, and now lefties on Facebook groups with memberships the size of a small town are posting crap like this about Conservative policies as a result (seen earlier tonight):

 

Jeremy Hunt’s doing a better job than Andrew Lansley

Hands up who else thinks that Jeremy Hunt is doing a better job than Andrew Lansley as Secretary of State for Health?

When Lansley was in the job you could hardly tell if he was doing anything, and the only time you knew he was there was when his name popped-up in the ConservativeHome monthly satisfaction survey.

In contrast Jeremy Hunt has made headlines for doing undercover shifts in NHS Hospitals, and telling the NHS they must treat patients as people + bringing back the Family Doctor.

Another Conservative MP enters my bad books

The latest addition is Justine Greening, having today been reported in the Telegraph & Daily Mail to be in support of increasing tax on Petrol & Diesel at a time the bloody things (remember, fuel gets taxed twice – fuel duty + V.A.T) need cutting to encourage growth & stop ripping off tax payers by charging more in tax on petrol & diesel than the actual fuel costs. The members of the public commenting below the 2 articles don’t sound too chuffed with her either. So much for the potential she showed looking into the Car Insurance rip-off not so long ago.

The previous MP to get into my bad books being Claire Perry – the one completely oblivious to products such as Net Nanny, Cyber Patrol, the filtering built into ZoneAlarm Internet Security Suite & similar products, and even Internet Browsers such as Internet Exploder & Mozilla Firefox. It’s now even built into the Windows7 Operating System, for christ’s sake. The one who wants ISPs to introduce porn filtering as default on their web access packages, similar to the bloody useless one VODAFONE place on their customers that discriminates against people who can only get a Debit Card, not a Credit Card (that’s needed to prove age to get past the sodding filter) + blocks legitimate websites as well as dodgy ones. She was also the one who told the excellent Douglas Carswell MP to f___ off to UKIP, and previously also had an outburst against “Mr Squeaker” Bercow.